Notes for Figure 6H­101CA) – Typical Application 101(CA) Shoulder Closure on Urban (Low Speed) Locations to Accommodate Bicyclists

 

Guidance:

  1. When existing accommodations for bicycle travel are disrupted or closed, information and devices contained in Figures 6H­101(CA) through 6H­104(CA), as appropriate per situation encountered, should be used to consider the needs and control of bicyclists through a TTC zone.
  2. SHOULDER CLOSED signs should be used on limited­access roadways where there is no opportunity for disabled vehicles to pull off the roadway.
  3. If drivers cannot see a pull­off area beyond the closed shoulder, information regarding the length of the shoulder closure should be provided in feet or miles, as appropriate.
  4. The use of a temporary traffic barrier should be based on engineering judgment.

Standard:

  1. Temporary traffic barriers, including their end treatments, shall be crashworthy. In order to mitigate the effect of striking the upstream end of a temporary traffic barrier, the end shall be installed in accordance with AASHTO’s “Roadside Design Guide” (see Section 1A.11) by flaring until the end is outside the acceptable clear zone or by providing crashworthy end treatments. See Section 6F.85 for more details.

Option:

  1. The barrier shown in this typical application is an example of one method that may be used to close a shoulder of a long­term project.
  2. The warning lights shown on the barrier may be used.

Standard:

  1. The minimum offset from the upstream end of the barrier to the edge of the traveled way shall be at least 15 feet unless shielded by a crash cushion.

Guidance:

  1. This typical application should only be used in urban areas where posted speed is 25 mph or less. For applications on roadway with a posted speed of 30 mph or more use typical application TA­102(CA).
  2. All advance warning signs should be placed so that the path of travel for bicycles is not blocked, while maintaining visibility for road users.
  3. Where feasible, an adequate lane width should be provided to allow bicyclists and motor vehicles to travel side by side throughout the TTC zone. If lane width conditions are not met, use the SHARE THE ROAD or Bicycles May Use Full Lane sign.
  4. The speeds used for the shoulder taper calculations should be of bicyclists in the project vicinity or if a special event such as a bike race, the expected speed of bicyclists approaching the TTC zone. 

 

Notes for Figure 6H­102(CA) – Typical Application 102(CA) Lane Closure on Freeway, Expressway, Rural and Urban (High Speed) Locations to Accommodate Bicyclists 

 

Guidance:

  1. When existing accommodations for bicycle travel are disrupted or closed, information and devices contained in Figures 6H­101(CA) through 6H­104(CA), as appropriate per situation encountered, should be used to consider the needs and control of bicyclists through a TTC zone.
  2. SHOULDER CLOSED signs should be used on limited­access highways where there is no opportunity for disabled vehicles to pull off the roadway.
  3. If drivers cannot see a pull­off area beyond the closed shoulder, information regarding the length of the shoulder closure should be provided in feet or miles, as appropriate.
  4. The use of a temporary traffic barrier should be based on engineering judgment.

Standard:

  1. Temporary traffic barriers, including their end treatments, shall be crashworthy. In order to mitigate the effect of striking the upstream end of a temporary traffic barrier, the end shall be installed in accordance with AASHTO’s “Roadside Design Guide” (see Section 1A.11) by flaring until the end is outside the acceptable clear zone or by providing crashworthy end treatments. See Section 6F.85 for more details.

Option:

  1. The barrier shown in this typical application is an example of one method that may be used to close a shoulder of a long­term project.
  2. The warning lights shown on the barrier may be used.

Standard:

  1. The minimum offset from the upstream end of the barrier to the edge of the traveled way shall be at least 15 feet unless shielded by a crash cushion.

Guidance:

  1. All advance warning signs should be placed so that the path of travel for bicycles is not blocked, while maintaining visibility for road users.
  2. The width of the existing pedestrian facility should be provided for the temporary facility, if practical. When it is not possible to maintain a minimum width of 60 inch throughout the entire length of the pedestrian pathway, a 60 x 60 inch passing space should be provided at least every 200 feet to allow individuals in wheelchairs to pass. 
 

 

NotefoFigur6H104(CA) —TypicaApplication 104(CA) RighLanand BikLanClosure on Far Side of Intersection

Guidance:

  1. When existing accommodations for bicycle travel are disrupted or closed, information and devices contained in Figures 6H­101(CA) through 6H­104(CA), as appropriate per situation encountered, should be used to consider the needs and control of bicyclists through a TTC zone.
  2. If the work space extends across a crosswalk, the crosswalk should be closed using the information and devices shown in Figure 6H­29.

Option:

  1. The normal procedure is to close on the near side of the intersection any lane that is not carried through the intersection. However, when this results in the closure of a right lane having significant right turning movements, then the right lane may be restricted to right turns only, as shown. This procedure increases the through capacity by eliminating right turns from the open through lane.
  2. For intersection approaches reduced to a single lane, left­turning movements may be prohibited to maintain capacity for through vehicular traffic.
  3. Flashing warning lights and/or flags may be used to call attention to the advance warning signs.
  4. Where the turning radius is large, it may be possible to create a right­turn island using channelizing devices or pavement markings.

Guidance:

  1. All advance warning signs should be placed so that the path of travel for bicycles is not blocked, while maintaining visibility for road users.
  2. For long­term duration projects (see Section 6G.02), consideration should be given to installing signs in an overhead location.

Option:

  1. A high­level warning device (flag tree) may supplement the advance warning signs. Refer to Section 6F.62. 
 

 

 

Notes for Figure 6H­103(CA)—Typical Application 103(CA) Detour for Bike Laneon Roads with Closure of One Travel Direction 

 

Guidance:

  1. When existing accommodations for bicycle travel are disrupted or closed, information and devices contained in Figures 6H­101(CA) through 6H­104(CA), as appropriate per situation encountered, should be used to consider the needs and control of bicyclists through a TTC zone.
  2. This plan should be used for streets without posted route numbers.
  3. On multi­lane streets, Detour signs with an Advance Turn Arrow should be used in advance of a turn.

Option:

  1. The STREET CLOSED legend may be used in place of ROAD CLOSED.
  2. Additional DO NOT ENTER signs may be used at intersections with intervening streets.
  3. Warning lights may be used on Type III Barricades.
  4. Detour signs may be located on the far side of intersections.
  5. A Street Name sign may be mounted with the Detour sign. The Street Name sign may be either white on green or black on orange.

Standard:

  1. When used, the Street Name sign shall be placed above the Detour sign.

Guidance:

  1. The DETOUR (M4­8) sign should be placed on tangent sections at intervals not to exceed 1300 feet and at major intersections.

Option:

  1. In urban areas, the M4­-8 signs may be placed at every intersection.

Guidance:

  1. When the detour is applicable to bicyclists and not pedestrians, the Bicycle Detour (M4­9c) sign should be used instead of the Pedestrian/Bicycle Detour (M4­9a) sign.
  2. All advance warning signs should be placed so that the path of travel for bicycles is not blocked, while maintaining visibility for road users.

Option:

  1. For long­term duration projects (see Section 6G.02), the shared roadway bicycle marking may be used along detours with on­street parking and inadequate lane width.