Notes for Figure 6H-36 6H-36(CA—Typical Application 3Lane Shift on a Freeway

Guidance:

  1. The lane shift should be used when the work space extends into either the right-hand or left-hand lane of a divided highway and it is not practical, for capacity reasons, to reduce the number of available lanes.

Support:

 

  1. When a lane shift is accomplished by using:
  1. geometry that meets the design speed at which the permanent highway was designed,
  2. full normal cross-section (full lane width and full shoulders), and
  3. complete pavement markings, then only the initial general work-zone warning sign is required.

Guidance:

 

  1. When the conditions in Note 2 are not met, the information shown in the typical application should bemployed and all the following notes apply.

Standard:

 

  1. Temporary traffic barriers, if used, shall comply with the provisions of Section 6F.85.
  2. The barrier shall not be placed along the shifting taper. The lane shall first be shifted usinchannelizing devices and pavement markings.

Guidance:

 

  1. A warning sign should be used to show the changed alignment.

Standard:

 

  1. The number of lanes illustrated on the Reverse Curve signs shall be the same as the number of through lanes available to road users, and the direction of the reverse curves shall be appropriately illustrated.

Option:

 

  1. Where two or more lanes are being shifted, a W1-4 (or W1-3) sign with an ALL LANES (W24-1cP) plaque (see Figure 6F-4) may shall be used instead of a sign that illustrates the number of lanes. The Reverse Curve (W1­-4) sign shall be used instead of the Reverse Curve (W1-­4a & W1­-4b) signs which shows the number of lanes. 

Option:

 

  1. Where more than three lanes are being shifted, the Reverse Curve (or Turn) sign may be rectangular.

Guidance:

 

  1. Where the shifted section is longer than 600 feet, one set of Reverse Curve signs should be used to show the initial shift and a second set should be used to show the return to the normal alignment. If the tangent distance along the temporary diversion is less than 600 feet, a Double Reverse Curve sign should be used instead of the first Reverse Curve sign, and the second Reverse Curve sign should be omitted. Use the Reverse Curve (W1­-4) signs for both locations instead of the Double Reverse Curve (W24-­1) sign.  
  2. If a STAY IN LANE sign is used, then solid white lane lines should be used.

Standard:

 

  1. The minimum width of the shoulder lane shall be 10 feet.
  2. For long-term stationary work, existing conflicting pavement markings shall be removed antemporary markings shall be installed before traffic patterns are changed.

Option:

 

  1. For short-term stationary work, lanes may be delineated by channelizing devices or removable pavement markings instead of temporary markings.

Guidance:

 

  1. If the shoulder cannot adequately accommodate trucks, trucks should be directed to use the travel lanes.
  2. The use of a barrier should be based on engineering judgment.

Option:

 

  1. Type C Steady-Burn warning lights may be placed on channelizing devices and the barrier parallel to the edge of the pavement for nighttime lane closures.

Option:

  1. Detail 11 (see Figure 3A­102(CA)) may be used instead of the temporary solid white lane line, which is shown in Figure 6H-­36(CA).

Support:

  1. See Section 6F.106(CA) for use of the Slow For The Cone Zone (SC19(CA) and SC20(CA)) Signs.Guidance:
  2. All advance warning signs should be placed so that the path of travel for bicycles is not blocked, while maintaining visibility for road users.
  3. When existing accommodations for bicycle travel are disrupted or closed in a long­term duration project (see Section 6G.02) and the roadway width is inadequate for allowing bicyclists and motor vehicles to travel side by side, the Bicycle Crossing (W11­-1) sign and the SHARE THE ROAD (W16­-1P) plaque should be used to advise motorists of the presence of bicyclists in the travel way lanes.
  4. Except for short durations and mobile operations, when a highway shoulder is occupied and bicyclists would be sharing a lane with vehicular traffic, as a result of the TTC zone, speed reduction countermeasures should be used to reduce traffic speeds in the TTC zone. Refer to Sections 6C.01 and 6D.03.
  5. Except for short durations and mobile operations, when a highway shoulder is occupied and bicyclists would be sharing a lane with vehicular traffic, as a result of the TTC zone, before narrowing the outside lane other measures such as widening the outside shoulder to allow bicyclists and motor vehicles to travel side by side through the TTC zone should be considered.
  6. If traffic volumes make it feasible, the two left lanes should be merged into one lane to avoid using the shoulder as a traveled way lane and allowing continued use for emergency purposes and bicycle travel.
  7. When existing accommodations for bicycle travel are disrupted or closed in a long­term duration project (see Section 6G.02) and the roadway width is inadequate for allowing bicyclists and motor vehicles to travel side by side, a separate path should be considered for bicyclists.